National Security Searches

National Security is of the utmost importance for a company in any industry. These additional searches can be added to any package for maximum protection and the most thorough background screening. Let us prepare a custom package designed for your specific needs.

FBIFBI Most Wanted List

A list of the top 10 most wanted individuals by the Federal Bureau of Investigations. These 10 individuals are considered the most dangerous fugitives in the country. Individuals can be removed from the list if they are captured, have died or if the charges against them have been dropped.

FBI Most Wanted Terrorists List

A list of the most wanted individuals who have been indicted by a Federal grand jury for crimes of terrorism by the Federal Bureau of Investigations. This list was created in 2001 after the 9/11 attacks. This list acts as a “companion list” to the FBI Most Wanted List.

FBI Seeking Information – War on Terrorism

A list of the most wanted suspected terrorists who are operating against the U.S. These individuals can be living domestically or internationally.  The major difference between the Seeking Information – War on Terrorism list and the Most Wanted Terrorists list is this list does not include individuals who have been indicted by grand juries in the U.S. District Courts. The main goal of this list is to obtain any vital information about the suspected terrorists who may be planning future terrorist attacks. This is the second “companion list” to the FBI Most Wanted List.

DEADEA Denied Parties List

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is a federal law enforcement agency under the U.S. Department of Justice. It is the lead agency responsible for the enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act and managing U.S. drug investigations internationally. The DEA is led by the Administrator of Drug Enforcement.

The DEA’s primary responsibilities include:

  • Investigation of all suspected major violators (including drug gangs) of controlled substance laws at both the national and international levels
  • Management of the national drug intelligence program
  • Seizure and forfeiture of all funds that come from illegal drug trafficking
  • Enforcement of the Controlled Substance Act
  • Working with the United Nations, Interpol and other organizations on international drug control programs

The DEA Denied Parties List holds all individuals and entities which have violated drug laws and cannot work with any controlled substances. Crimcheck.com can perform this search for all candidates and entities. This search is especially important for those working in the medical field.

Department of Corrections

The Department of Corrections is the governmental agency responsible for the incarceration of individuals who have been convicted of crimes. The Department of Corrections is organized by state and holds records for those individuals who have been incarcerated due to a felony or misdemeanor held at the county level. They do not hold records for any federal crimes.

Each state’s DOC list provides details and information of any person who has ever been incarcerated at a county/state prison, either in previous years or currently. Crimcheck.com can check these lists, based off residential history, for any incriminating information.

BOPFederal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is a law enforcement agency subdivision of the U.S. Department of Justice. It is responsible for the administration of the federal prison system and all judicially ordered federal executions. There are over 116 institutions and 210,000 federal offenders under the supervision of the BOP.

Crimcheck.com utilizes the Federal Bureau of Prison Inmate Locator to search for candidates that are currently or previously have been incarcerated in federal prison from 1982 to present.

The BOP has different security levels; they are:

  • Federal Prison Camps (FPC) – minimum security facilities
  • Federal Correctional Institutions (FCI) – low or medium security facilities
  • United States Penitentiaries (USP) – medium or high security facilities
  • Federal Correctional Complexes (FCC) – Co-locations of BOP facilities and have different security locations and genders of inmates

The BOP also has 5 different administrative facilities with specialized missions:

  • Federal Detention Centers (FDC)
  • Federal Medical Centers (FMC)
  • Federal Transfer Center (FTC)
  • Metropolitan Correctional Centers (MCC)
  • Metropolitan Detention Centers (MDC)

Patriot Act

The USA Patriot Act is an act that was signed into a law. It stands for Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Requires to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001. Under the Patriot Act, there is a government watch list that catalogs suspected terrorists and those who do not abide by the Patriot Act. Crimcheck.com can search this list and return either a clear (no records found) or questionable (candidate is on watch list and is a suspected terrorist) result.

The US Patriot Act’s main goal is to strengthen security controls. This is accomplished by the three main objectives; reduce law enforcement agencies’ restrictions on gathering intelligence within the U.S., expand the authority of the Secretary of the Treasurer to regulate financial transactions and give more authority to law enforcement agencies and immigration authorities in detaining and deporting immigrants who are suspected of executing terrorist acts.

There are 10 Titles within the Act:

Title I: Enhanced Domestic Security against Terrorism – Authorizes actions which prevent terrorism in the U.S for domestic security services, including the addition of a nationwide crime task force and the authority for the president to confiscate foreign property of those who is suspected to have aided a war or attack on the U.S. This title also outlaws discrimination against Arab and Muslim Americans.

Title II: Surveillance Procedures – Handles all aspects of the surveillance of suspected terrorists, especially those suspected on computer fraud or abuse and agents of foreign power. The title also permits government agencies to collect “foreign intelligence information” from both U.S. and non-U.S. citizens.

This title also covers other miscellaneous ratifications, including increasing the number of FISC judges, trade sanctions against Taliban-controlled Afghanistan and North Korea and employment of FBI translators.

Title III: Anti-Money-Laundering to Prevent Terrorism – Aims to prevent, detect and prosecute international money laundering and financing of terrorism. This is done by strengthening banking rules against money laundering, expanding record keeping and reporting requirements and forming harsher penalties against those who manufacture and then smuggle counterfeit foreign currency.

Title IV: Border Security – Gives more investigative power and law enforcement to the U.S. Attorney General and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). It also allocates more funds to hire more border patrol personnel, customs services personnel and INS inspectors and to improve technology for border monitoring.

Title V: Removing Obstacles to Investigating Terrorism – Allows the payment of rewards to combat terrorism and prevent terrorist acts with funds from the U.S. Attorney General. It also allows the use of National Security Letters, making them stronger and to be used against U.S. citizens. They also contain a gag order to prevent the target of the NSL from knowing about it or telling anyone about it.

Title VI: Victims and Families of Victims of Terrorism – Amends the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 to change how the U.S. Victims of Crime Fund was managed and funded and contains provisions on financial compensation for victims of terrorism and their families.

Title VII: Increased Information Sharing for Critical Infrastructure Protection – Amends the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to increase law enforcement power to fight terrorist activity that crosses jurisdictional borders.

Title VIII: Terrorism Criminal Law – Amends the definition of terrorism and establishes or re-defined rules of how to deal with terrorism. This title also created new penalties for those who attack mass transportation systems and put into place new measures which penalize activities that are deemed to support terrorism, including cyber-terrorism.

Title IX: Improved Intelligence – Created a method for sharing national intelligence information between government agencies.

Title X: Miscellaneous – Includes many minor provisions that do not fit into the other 9 titles.

Terms to Know

Computer Crime: Any crime which involves a computer and a network.

Cyber-Terrorism: An assault on electronic communication networks.

Domestic Terrorism: Terrorism which takes place in an individual’s home country against their own people. Includes violence, mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping

Extradite: Delivery of a fugitive or criminal to the legal jurisdiction where the crime was committed.

Lone Wolves: Individuals who are suspected of committing terrorist activities but are not linked to a specific terrorist group.

Mutual Treaty: An agreement under international law

National Security Letters: Administrative subpoena used by government agencies like the FBI and CIA which demands a entity release their records and data about specific individuals with no probable cause or judicial review.

Racketeering: Engaging in criminal activity for illegal business purposes. Includes extortion, bribery and obstruction of justice

Subpoena: A written order for an individual to attend court.

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